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What You Need To Know About Your Myrtle Beach Pool Water

What You Need To Know About Your Myrtle Beach Pool Water

When it comes to swimming in your Myrtle Beach pool water, it is imperative to understand that your tap water does not equal your pool water! There’s much that has to be done to treat your swimming pool water in order to make it safe and healthy for you and your family. Some of the tests needed will be to check for alkalinity levels, as well as the calcium hardness. It is necessary to sequester the various minerals and metals in the water and something known as a stabilizer will need to be added to the water to ensure that the chlorine stays in and does its job. Finally, the pH balance in the water has to be checked frequently to determine how much chlorine is needed. Treating New Water In Your Myrtle Beach Pool One thing that is often forgotten is that you must treat any new pool water that gets added. This means if the pool overflows, gets a lot of rainwater or if the water level gets low and more new water is added. All new water has to be treated! Failing to do this will result in the plaster being damaged or stained, equipment being damaged and also it can cause algae to grow and the water to be unsafe. Any time you have 10-12 inches of water added or replaced, new treatment should be done. Pets In Pools A few things about dogs in pools. First of all, yes it is ok to let your pet swim in the pool. You should understand, however, that you’ll need to pay more attention to cleaning out the...
How Warm Should Your Pool Water Be?

How Warm Should Your Pool Water Be?

Right Water Temperature For Hot Tubs and Pools It’s one of the most frequent questions we get: How hot should I keep my hot tub and/or pool? Several deciding factors go into that answer, but we’ll cover some of the things to consider here in this article… What Will Your Pool Be Used For?  This is a good question. The temperature should be set depending on which region in the country you live, as well as who uses it and what they are using it for. For competitive purposes, the pool water would need to be around 78 degrees, which is a relatively lower temperature. Public swimming pools on the other hand, are usually a little warmer, with temps anywhere from 78 F – 82 F. The water would be warmer still for therapy uses, classes for children or elderly people. For these purposes, the water would be more like 83-86 F. Many people say that the prefect water temperature for swimming laps would be around 75 degrees. Still others maintain it should be closer to 70 degrees. So that brings us back to the original question of how warm the pool water should be. The truth of the matter is that if you are fortunate enough to own a pool, then the water temperature really comes down to your personal preference. Obviously, if you don’t heat your pool, then the weather will be what determines how warm the water is. If you live in a warm climate, then by the first part of July, the water may feel more like bath water. The main thing is to ask...